jedavu:

Watercolors by Andriy Yeroshewych

jedavu:

NUART 2014: THE INSTALLATIONS

jedavu:

Exhibition postcards design by Carne Griffiths

coalblack:

Jacob van Loon
Landscape Resets 5-9

poboh:

The Palace Linen, Sir William Russell Flint. (1880 - 1969)
- Watercolor -

poboh:

The Palace Linen, Sir William Russell Flint. (1880 - 1969)
- Watercolor -

jedavu:

MURALS BY ARYZ

Nothing human is finally calculable; even to ourselves we are strange.

—Gore Vidal  (via likeafieldmouse)

(Source: theparisreview)

asylum-art:

Jen Mazza

Jen Mazza’s provocative small paintings derive their power from both the strength of her formal skill as well as the intellectual and emotional content which forms the ballast of her imagery. The paintings range in subject from figuration to landscapes and objects. They have in common their painterly approach to representation and an engagement with the process and history of painting.
Mazza’s work has been reviewed in the New York Times, the New Jersey Star Ledger and Contemporary magazine. Dan Bischoff wrote the following for the Star Ledger: “Mazza’s paintings make you lean in to catch the tiniest detail and then contemplate the larger implications of the details we see. Like peering through a pinhole, it suggests far more information than it really provides. And of course, the pictures wouldn’t really work if Mazza could not handle paint well enough to justify the inspection. The deviltry is in her details.”

asylum-art:

Inspirational Art by Kenyan ArtistbWangechi Mutu

Wangechi Mutu is an African artist renowned for her haunting and dramatic female figures. An artist from Nairobi, Kenya, Mutu creates painted and collaged images of the female body offering a commentary on feminist and racial issues such as the history of women’s representation, cultural migration, global identity, colonial legacies, exoticism, and voyeuristic fascination.

Mutu’s work has been featured in museums and galleries all around the world exhibited in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Miami Art Museum, Tate Modern in London, the Studio Museum in Harlem in New York, Kunstpalast Dusseldorf in Germany, and the Centre Pompidou in Paris. She participated in the 2004 Gwangju Biennale in South Korea. Her work has been featured in several major exhibitions including Greater New York at the P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, Black President at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York and the Barbican in London, and USA Today at The Royal Academy in London. As a unique visual artist Mutu’s work has important political and social implications.

Wangechi Mutu observes: “Females carry the marks, language and nuances of their culture more than the male. Anything that is desired or despised is always placed on the female body.” Piecing together magazine imagery with painted surfaces and found materials, Mutu’s collages explore the split nature of cultural identity, referencing colonial history, fashion and contemporary African politics.

(Source: ForGIFs.com)